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Three new books from vicar Revd Dr Sam Wells

News St Martin – Talking Points

Thursday 19 September 2013

Three new books by St Martin-in-the-Fields’ vicar Revd Dr Sam Wells were published over the summer. Sam tells us a little bit about each book: 

Learning to Dream Again is book I wrote exactly for people like the congregation at St Martin’s: it tries to bring together the triangle of social issues, bible and Christian theology, and personal faith and doubt, in the way my preaching seeks to do. It covers intimate, emotional territory as well as public policy questions like torture, taxes, and justice. A lot of people have told me they like to read a reflection or two each night before they go to bed.

“I love words and my research studies were in how worship forms character so I decided to write a book about how to intercede and what intercession really is. Crafting Prayers for Public Worship: The Art of Intercession was the result. I really enjoyed writing it and it puts together a good number of thoughts I’ve had about praying with a congregation over 22 years in ordained ministry.

Esther and Daniel (written jointly with George Sumner) is a very different kind of a book. It’s a commentary on two Old Testament books. I only wrote the Esther part – in fact the Daniel part was written by a man I’ve never met. I was honoured to be invited to write a book in the Brazos Commentary Series, because it’s a series where theologians – rather than biblical scholars – write commentaries on the Bible – and those are the kinds of commentaries I most like to read. I wanted to write on Esther because exile is a theme I’ve thought a lot about. But it turned out that Esther wasn’t about exile – it was about the subtly different experience of diaspora. So it turned into a rather different book from the one I expected.”

Revd Dr Sam Wells